About Joe Paprocki 2375 Articles
Joe Paprocki, DMin, is National Consultant for Faith Formation at Loyola Press, where, in addition to his traveling/speaking responsibilities, he works on the development team for faith formation curriculum resources including Finding God: Our Response to God’s Gifts and God’s Gift: Reconciliation and Eucharist. Joe has more than 35 years of experience in ministry and has presented keynotes, presentations, and workshops in more than 100 dioceses in North America. Joe is a frequent presenter at national conferences including the Los Angeles Religious Education Congress, the Mid-Atlantic Congress, and the National Conference for Catechetical Leadership. He is the author of numerous books, including the best seller The Catechist’s Toolbox, A Church on the Move, Under the Influence of Jesus, and Called to Be Catholic—a bilingual, foundational supplemental program that helps young people know their faith and grow in their relationship with God. Joe is also the series editor for the Effective Catechetical Leader and blogs about his experiences in faith formation at www.catechistsjourney.com.

2 Comments on Activities! Activities! Activities!

  1. Wow Joe. This activity finder is like hitting the jackpot for ideas. I’m sure I’ll be using it on some of the occasional (or frequent?) panic-stricken mornings when I think I don’t have any ideas for class.

    We had our catechist meeting last night and our DRE mentioned that they may be doing more large group activities (some public speakers) for 8th grade this year. This, of course, is my first year doing 8th grade……initially seems like a great idea to me to mix it up between large group / small group although I can see a potential challenge if I really have to start squeezing in my teaching materials. Your thoughts?

    Greg

    • Greg, I understand how you feel about that. We have a number of “interruptions” like that as well. Some of them are very worthwhile and others….well, I’m not so sure. It does make it very hard to develop a flow and get a sense of consistency. It is a nice way to break up the monotony as long as it is the exception to the norm!

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