Inviting Students to Evaluate

One of the things I plan on doing this Monday evening is having the kids complete an evaluation of their experience with me this past year. I often did this when I was a high school religion teacher and I found the feedback very helpful. I’ll have to formulate some kind of an evaluation form for them to use…that is, unless someone out there already has one!!! If so, I’d love to see it if you’d share it with me and my readers. Just attach it to an email to paprocki@loyolapress.com.

Have a great weekend!

About Joe Paprocki 2365 Articles
Joe Paprocki, DMin, is National Consultant for Faith Formation at Loyola Press, where, in addition to his traveling/speaking responsibilities, he works on the development team for faith formation curriculum resources including Finding God: Our Response to God’s Gifts and God’s Gift: Reconciliation and Eucharist. Joe has more than 35 years of experience in ministry and has presented keynotes, presentations, and workshops in more than 100 dioceses in North America. Joe is a frequent presenter at national conferences including the Los Angeles Religious Education Congress, the Mid-Atlantic Congress, and the National Conference for Catechetical Leadership. He is the author of numerous books, including the best seller The Catechist’s Toolbox, A Church on the Move, Under the Influence of Jesus, and Called to Be Catholic—a bilingual, foundational supplemental program that helps young people know their faith and grow in their relationship with God. Joe is also the series editor for the Effective Catechetical Leader and blogs about his experiences in faith formation at www.catechistsjourney.com.

9 Comments on Inviting Students to Evaluate

  1. Joe, I really enjoyed reading your evaluation results. I hope to incorporate it
    in my classes in some way at the end of the year.
    I tried to find the session where you first explained the Sacred Space and just how you set it up but do not know what to type into the topic block. What I really want to know is: Do you read a guided meditation each class or just let
    them to pray alone? I have done the guided meditations from a book but did not
    have them find a sacred space so I would like to hear again how you set that up.
    I have large classes and if I could take them to the library there would be room
    but I am not sure they would hear spread out in such a large space?????
    Any suggestions?

    • Mary, thanks for your comments. Here’s the post where I explain how I introduce sacred space to the students: https://catechistsjourney.loyolapress.com/2009/09/17/my-first-session-part-3/
      I always do some kind of guided reflection rather than just giving them the time on their own because I think they need the structure. They don’t have to be from a book though…you can just create a few thoughts to guide them in their imagination. By all means, DO pay attention to how far apart they are spread in the library because it is possible for them to be spread out TOO far. Let me know how things go and if you have any other questions! Best wishes!

  2. Joe, I always check your site. Thanks so much for sharing with us. I’m going to think about a more structured year end eval. I work with sophmores and the last two years I have them evaluate each class. One of the last things they do before they walk out the door is answer two open ended questions on an index card.
    -What worked for you this class?
    -What didn’t work for you?
    -On the back of the card -?’s
    -There are no names. They all fill them out. I use the cards to help form the class as the year goes on. I’m very responsive to the input. I’m surprised they are so impressed with the prayer services. It’s been a great tool for me. The kids take the cards seriously and I do too. They see changes based on the cards the very next class or there is an explanation at the start of the next class addressing a concern. Thanks for such a great site Joe!

      • The kids really enjoy the guided meditations. I write them myself. I think those are their favorites. We just completed a class on the Holy Spirit and I asked the kids to be quiet and think about what we talked about. Then I asked them to write a prayer. They were beautiful. We read those and that turned into an extremely reverent prayer service. We will do a reading, usually one for an upcoming Sunday. The kids will pick out a line that grabs them, we all share. The kids say why they picked that line, we all share. The kids say what they think they are supposed to do with this line, we all share. Then we go around the circle and each person says one word to sum up the experience. Then we will go into a prayer. Sometimes, two kids will be prepped ahead of time with a structure of reading a scripture and they apply it to an everyday situation, we discuss it as a group and end in a prayer. It’s nothing that is a big deal but sometimes the kids really surprise themselves like with their homemade prayers to the Holy Spirit. Those were beautiful, each one moreso than the next. It’s just something they ping on with the index cards. They like it.

    • Mary, I’ve heard of folks doing this but I don’t have a sample form myself. Perhaps another reader will send in a sample.

      • Joe,

        If I develop one, I will share. It will be bilingual. Right now, I am working on one for the catechists to evaluate the program constructively and also to lead them into some self reflection. I was going to reunite them but based on rumors…I think it will get a bit ugly. I want them to learn that it is not about “us” and that if there is a complaint …a solution should be offered to improve for our children’s sake and our faith family. I have been searching the net and I have found nothing in Spanish so I am creating one from the posts on your site. Thank you soo much!

        Blessings,

        Mary

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